© 2013 by Nursing As Caring

Theory in Research

01

Barry, Charlotte Duddy.  The values lived in the day-to-day practice of nursing.  (1993).  Florida Atlantic University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 1993. 1353747.



The purpose of this study was to examine nursing's values as they are lived day-to-day in nursing practice. A nurse's story, a reflective remembrance of a nursing situation, was explored for the illumination of nursing's values embedded in the service activities of the nurse. Using qualitative descriptive content analysis, the analysis revealed three transcendent values, reflected in every activity: Caring, respect for the dignity of the other, and inner harmony. The analysis further revealed eight actualizing values, individually embodying the transcendent values: compassion, competence, courage, humility, honesty, commitment, trust and hope. The wholeness of the inquiry is presented using metaphor to illuminate the meaning of nursing's values in nursing practice

02

Drumm, Judith T.  (2006). The student's experience of learning caring in a college of nursing grounded in a caring philosophy. Florida Atlantic University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. 3220671.



This phenomenological research study to investigate the lived experience of students learning caring in a college of nursing grounded in a caring philosophy was guided by the caring theories of Boykin and Schoenhofer (2001), Roach (2002), and the philosopher Mayeroff (1971). Transcripts of the audiotaped interviews with seven senior baccalaureate student nurses were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven-step methodology. Two major themes and six sub-themes related to learning caring emerged and an exhaustive description of the students learning of caring in a caring based curriculum was developed. The two major themes identified were: Innate Knowing of Self as Caring, and Caring in the Curriculum. The first major theme of Innate Knowing of Self as Caring is supported by the sub-themes: Being present for the patient, Being open to reshape the patient's experience, and Enhanced capacity to care. The second major theme of Caring in the Curriculum is supported by the sub-themes: Clinical experiences are valuable to learning, Doing little things to express caring, and Learning activities facilitated understanding caring.

03

Dunn, Dorothy J.  (2009).  What keeps nurses in nursing: A Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenological study. Florida Atlantic University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 2009. 3388794.



The theory of Nursing As Caring provided the theoretical perspective that framed a Heideggerian Hermeneutic phenomenological study of what keeps nurses in nursing by examining the relational experiences between nurse and nursed in eight nursing situations.  Four relational themes emerged from this investigation:  Practicing from Inner Core Beliefs, Understanding the Other from Within, Making a Difference, and Nursing as an Evolving Process. These themes were synthesized into a constitutive pattern of meaning:  Intentional Compassion Energy.

Eggenberger, Terry L.  (2011).  Holding the frontline: The experience of being a charge nurse in an acute care setting.  Florida Atlantic University.  ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 3462565

This qualitative descriptive exploratory study examined the experience of being a charge nurse in acute care practice, and describes how charge nurses live caring in their support of nurses and patients. Ray's (1989, 2006) theory of Bureaucratic Caring, Swanson's (2008) caring attributes and leadership, and Boykin and Schoenhofer's (2001) theory of Nursing as Caring provided the theoretical lenses through which study findings were viewed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 charge nurses in 4 acute care facilities. Eight themes emerged from an inductive analysis of the data describing the experience of being a charge nurse in acute care practice:  Creating a Safety Net, Monitoring for Quality, Showing the Way, Completing the Puzzle, Managing the Flow, Making a Difference, Putting Out Fires, and Keeping Patients Happy

04

Kongsuwan, Waraporn. Thai nurses' lived experience of caring for persons who had a peaceful death in intensive care units (2009).  Florida Atlantic University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing. 3351940.



The objective of this qualitative study informed by hermeneutic phenomenology was to describe the lived experience of caring for persons who had a peaceful death in the intensive care units in Thailand. Ten intensive care nurses working at adult intensive care units in south Thailand were interviewed in the Thai language.  The description of the lived experience of caring for persons who had a peaceful death in ICU was, "understanding the other through the valuing of experience and enhancing relations with others by recognizing time is short and is a priority."

05

Sternberg, Rosa Maria  (2009).  Latinas experiencing transnational motherhood.  Florida Atlantic University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 2009. 3401817.



This qualitative research study, framed from the theoretical perspective of Nursing As Caring, explored the experiences of Latinas living transnational motherhood, after having immigrated to the US for economic reasons, with their children left in the care of family members in the country of origin. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight Latinas living transnational motherhood between the ages 21-39. The findings in this study describe the lived experience of Latina transnational mothers within their social, economic and cultural context. The narrative, analyzed using van Manen's (1990) interpretative hermeneutic phenomenological approach to narrative analysis, found that Latinas experiencing transnational motherhood find meaning in mothering from afar through sacrifice, suffering, and hopefulness for a better life for their children, and for family reunification.  Nurses caring for women who immigrate without their children are presented with professional and ethical challenges that require nurses to be knowledgeable about these women's pre- and post-immigration experiences.

06